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Dolphins Are Captured And Brutally Starved So That They Can Be Trained “Easily” For Circus Shows

Dolphins are able to swim 8- miles a day. But this unfortunate pair got captured in a kiddie pool of a circus. The sad pair is forced to perform tricks in a travelling circus shows all over Indonesia, jumping through hoops and being irritated by noise crowds in a makeshift pool.
Aaron Gekoski
The worst part comes when the show is over and its time to move to the next show—they are removed from the water, covered in lubricant and put into stretchers to be shipped away. Not only that, but they also ride in trucks through bumpy roads for hours, without any water.
Aaron Gekoski
Aaron Gekoski, an environmental photojournalist visited the circus back in July to capture the horrendous reality for an animal charity called Born Free Foundation. His captures were truly heartbreaking.
Aaron Gekoski
“We went on a Tuesday during low season and there were very few visitors, who were exclusively locals,” Gekoski said. “Most people seemed to be having a good time — it may well have been the first time they’d seen dolphins. It’s just a shame these first impressions were formed in a small swimming pool, rather than in the dolphins’ natural habitat.”
Aaron Gekoski
Not just that, they also have a sun bear and two otters who perform tricks for the crowd and get scraps tossed to them as food.
Gekoski especially couldn’t take watching the bear perform.
Aaron Gekoski
“The bear was a very sad state,” Gekoski said. “Watching a sun bear perform chin-ups or catch hula hoops is just not natural. It was clearly incredibly hungry and was performing for its food. After the show, it was led backstage to a small holding area.”
Aaron Gekoski
This circus has a permit to host such shows. However, the Born Free Foundation is working tirelessly to encourage the country’s government to stop them. Unluckily, there are many other circuses that keep dolphins and similar other animals in harsh conditions.
Aaron Gekoski
Ric O’ Barry’s Dolphin Project has investigated the Indonesian shows deeply and it claims that fishermen who capture these dolphins starve them to easily train them. The group has also said that the pools they are held in highly chlorinated pools and their teeth are also intentionally damaged to make them less dangerous to the trainers.
Such shows mostly have loud music and flashing lights. The poor dolphins are forced to jump through hoops and do flips. And in some shows, they are even forced to make leaps through rings of fire.
Aaron Gekoski
“These are exceptionally complex and sensitive animals, perfectly adapted for life in the ocean,” Chris Draper, head of animal welfare and captivity for Born Free Foundation, told The Dodo. “It is unbelievable that they are hauled like baggage from place to place as part of a pitiful travelling show, apparently under permit by the Indonesian authorities. We are calling on the government of Indonesia to put a stop to this once and for all, and to work with animal protection groups to find a long-term solution for the unfortunate animals who have been subjected to this abuse.”
Aaron Gekoski
Gekoski hopes that people discourage such shows entirely by not attending them at all or by speaking against them.
Aaron Gekoski
“I want people to gain an insight into life as a performing animal,” Gekoski said. “I don’t want viewers to just see the animal; I want them to be the animal. Many species used in such shows are trained using cruel methods. They then spend the rest of their lives in captivity, living in completely unsuitable habitats, singing for their dinner. It’s not much of a life.”

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