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When This Cat Stalked A Massive Moose In Alaska, It Sparked An Unexpected Showdown

Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Tammy Simpson knew Ginger wasn’t the best hunter, but there was one exception: baby moose. Over the years, the cat has become obsessed with watching the creatures from the porch. And then one day, Ginger hunkered down into a stalking position and silently approached the calves.
Image: Marko Blažević
Big cats are expert hunters, and even their domesticated relatives are efficient little killing machines when they want to be. They’re renowned for bringing hunting trophies back for you and leaving them on your porch. Not all cats are very good at it, though.
Image: Alaskan Cats via The Dodo
Take Ginger, for example. According to her human Tammy Simpson, even though Ginger’s an adult, she never understood the food chain. “She hasn’t figured out how to hunt,” Simpson told The Dodo, “despite the fact that she’s seven years old.”
Image: Alaskan Cats via The Dodo
In fact, Ginger is a bit of a scaredy-cat when it comes to almost every aspect of life. She doesn’t like it when her mommy moves things around the house, and socks freak her out. Because of her anxiety issues, the predator lifestyle isn’t for her.
Image: Alaskan Cats via The Dodo
That suited Simpson just fine, and it was the kind of company she needed. She said, “I was very sick for a very long time. You know, people exhausted me. [Ginger] likes to cuddle, and so cats are good healing companions.”
Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters
That’s also why it both surprised and worried Simpson when Ginger began stalking wild animals. Simpson lives in Homer, Alaska, and regularly gets moose visiting her property. Ginger took a great interest in their comings and goings and paid special attention to the moose calves.
Image: YouTube/ViralHog
Moose don’t actively target people unless they get too close or act threatening. Domestic animals are another matter entirely, especially when it comes to dogs. Moose see dogs as dangerous predators, and they sometimes even seek them out to try and trample them.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Furthermore, mother moose are more aggressive when they’re with their calves, adding an extra dimension to the danger. Simpson uploaded the first video of Ginger’s moose watching hobby on June 2, 2013. It was around that time that the animals piqued her interest.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Simpson has described how Ginger has since become obsessed with moose and observes them every chance she gets. “If I point it out to her – if I’m like, ‘hey, there’s a moose!’ – she’s out on the deck ready to watch them,” Simpson said. But Ginger doesn’t need much encouragement.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
“Like, if she sees [one] from the window or from the glass door, she’s ready to go,” Simpson revealed. However, Ginger wasn’t content to just watch the moose from afar. One day she became so fascinated with the calves, she wanted to get a closer look.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Ginger’s first encounter with a moose didn’t go so well. She got into position, and exchanged glances with the moose family for a time. But when one of the moose made to approach her, the cat took off running for the porch.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Despite this setback, however, Ginger remained as curious as ever. On June 9, 2015, Simpson told the Anchorage Daily News that the behavior initially made her nervous. “I hold my breath every time and hope she’s quick enough to get out of any sticky situations,” she said.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
Ginger’s stalking methods begin with a mad dash down the garden to get closer to the moose. At a certain range, though, she slows right down and goes into prey-stalking mode. But despite her behavior, Ginger’s made no attempt to pounce on the moose.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
In fact, her attention seems to be a show of affection for the moose. Although Ginger’s fascinated by all moose visitors, she’s most enthusiastic about watching the calves. “It seems like when there’s babies in particular, she likes to head out there,” Simpson told The Dodo.
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
And it looks like the feeling’s mutual; the calves seem to have just as much interest in Ginger. After an uncertain start, two young moose got used to the cat’s visits. Subsequently, they even came closer to the house in search of Ginger.
Image: Arthur T. LaBar
But experts don’t seem to agree with Ginger’s actions, especially Jessy Coltrane from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. “Young [moose] are very vulnerable,” the wildlife biologist told the Anchorage Daily News. “And mothers are especially aggressive this time of year.”
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
In contrast, Simpson told The Dodo that moose have no problem with Ginger’s attention. “She’s not bothering them,” Simpson explained. “Like, I’ve never seen a moose get really upset. The one mother who had two twins, she just didn’t care.”
Image: Alaskan Cats via The Dodo
On the other hand, Ginger has always been an eccentric cat with some endearing – if unusual – habits. “She likes to put paper in her water dish and just kind of move it around,” Simpson told The Dodo. Her attempts to get attention are unique, too.
Image: Kristin Lopez
“She won’t meow or anything,” Simpson continued. “She’ll get really close to your face, and just stare. And eventually it wakes you up, like you can sense something’s there. It’s very terrifying, it makes me jump every time.”
Image: YouTube/Alaskan Cats
On March 14, 2018, Simpson uploaded another YouTube video revealing that Ginger is still up to her old tricks. Perhaps the moose know she doesn’t mean them any harm, or maybe they’re just not threatened by her. Either way, Ginger seems happy that she can get close to the objects of her affection.

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