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happyworld - After People Saw This Strange Creature Prowling Around They Immediately Called The Cops

    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    When residents of Ramona, California spotted a strange creature roaming around their neighborhood, they were curious – and some were even scared. This animal was unlike anything they had ever seen before. Once authorities finally discovered what it was, everyone was shocked.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    The strange beast had been seen in December of 2017, prowling around at night among dumpsters and garbage bins, looking for food. People who only heard the noises thought it might be a raccoon, but the locals who saw it knew that couldn’t be: the creature was pink and hairless. Those with more wildlife knowledge suspected it might be in need of help – and they were right.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    Angel Willoughby is a park ranger living in the area. She and her family spotted the animal near their home. Willoughby assumed the creature might be ill, given the strange mottled patches all over its body. They decided to catch it and contact wildlife experts for assistance, thought this would not be an easy task.


    California Department of Fish and Wildlife News
    The Willoughby’s dog chased the beast up a tree, as the family tried to figure out a way to catch it. Finally, they lured it towards a big trash bin and trapped it. They then took a picture of the animal and sent it to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Incredibly, staff at the department thought they recognized it.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    The CDFW had received reports of another creature just a week earlier in Forbestown, located in Butte County. That animal had also been foraging for food in people’s trash. But though this one was the same size, it look alarmingly different. If it was truly the same beast, then it was in deep trouble.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    The CDFW contacted the Fund for Animals Wildlife Center, and told them about the situation. They were concerned for the health of the creature, and said they might need the Center’s help. Staff at the FAWC began preparing in case the animal was to be sent their way, and got a recovery room ready. Soon everyone would know what this strange creature was.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    On December 23rd, the CDFW picked up the beast, and their experts were able to identify it. It was a female California black bear cub, no older than one year of age. But why was it hairless? Staff assumed it must have some kind of skin disease, but it would need a further examination to find out exactly what it had.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    After giving the cub a bath, staff performed a full exam that finally provided some answers: she had mange. Mange is caused by parasitic mites, and is transmitted through direct contact with an infected animal. Staff concluded it was the bear’s mother who passed it on to her – perhaps even dying from it and leaving the cub to fend for herself. Rescuers would have to work fast to stop her health from deteriorating further.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    Upon hearing the bear’s diagnosis, FAWC moved to make special arrangements for her arrival at the Center. They removed unnecessary obstacles from the recovery room, and made sure to get rid of straw bedding that could cause irritation or abrasions that might make her condition worse. Meanwhile, at the CDFW, they were determining the severity of the cub’s illness.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    The main symptom of mange is hair loss, but the disease has other side effects. The irritation makes the skin itch, which causes the affected animal to scratch – risking severe damage to sensitive areas. Additionally, mange can weaken the immune system, making the animal vulnerable to further infections. Amazingly, this bear had no secondary infections and wasn’t emaciated. Hopeful she would make a full recovery, they sent her off to the FAWC for treatment.


    Homedit
    The cub was driven to the FAWC on Christmas Eve. The volunteers who drove her thought she deserved a name, and though the Center doesn’t name their patients, they decided to call her “Eve.” She was in good hands, as the FAWC is one of the only places in California equipped to treat black bears. But her recovery would be long.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    Eve was started on medicated baths to begin killing the mites and other bacteria, and was put in a sterilized room to prevent additional infections. Despite her strange surroundings, she adapted quickly. She proved to be a hearty eater, responding well to her food and supplements. Soon, her personality started to come out.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    Staff noticed that Eve was quite a diligent little bear. Every day, she would come out of her igloo and explore her room, looking for items to shred and build a nest with for the night. Eventually she was given straw bedding, in addition to her furs, blankets and palm fronds. They were captivated by her behavior, but more so by her progress.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    Less than three weeks later, Eve had already gained 25 pounds. She was given a complete health work-up, a full-body massage and a cleansing bath to remove dead and crusty scabs. She endured the procedure well, and her fresh pink skin will finally be able to grow new fur. In the meantime, she is being cared for and spoiled with tasty treats provided by the community.


    Facebook/The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center
    The FAWC estimates she will remain at the facility for at least six months. But something tells us she won’t mind. She has a cozy den with a heated floor, and keeps busy building nests. People in the area have been stopping by to donate yams, dates and other fruits and vegetables – even some salmon! Staff are confident she’ll make a full recovery and will be able to return to the wild before next Christmas.

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