Archaeologists Have Unearthed A 7,000-Year-Old Lost City That Was Buried Beneath The Egyptian Desert

Image: Facebook/Ministry of Antiquities and Robert Fraser
Deep in the heart of Egypt, scientists were busy at work. In fact, the modern country’s Ministry of Antiquities was exploring an area around the ancient remains of the New Kingdom. But despite the name, this area is actually very, very old.
Image: reibai
And what the archaeologists eventually discovered, in what is now the Sohag region, must have astounded them. However, their initial finds likely didn’t seem that impressive at first. Indeed, the researchers unearthed remnants of pottery and tools – hardly unusual finds during an archaeological dig.
Image: Michael
But the artifacts’ age made this an all-important find for the Egyptian archaeologists. Because as they would later discover, they had actually found the remnant of a city more than 7,000 years old. In fact, it dated back to 5316 BCE. What’s more, they unearthed the remains of the settlement a little less than 1,500 feet from the Temple of Seti I. This incredible structure, moreover, lies in the nearby Ancient Egyptian city of Abydos.
Image: Facebook/Ministry of Antiquities
In fact, the Ancient Egyptians thought of Abydos as a holy city. It was also the capital of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom. Now, however, the archaeologists believe that the city they’ve recently discovered may have played a part in the building of important sites such as Abydos.
Image: Facebook/Ministry of Antiquities
In November 2016, however, the researchers were still digging, deep in the process of discovering the city’s secrets. And besides the remains of old tools, they found houses – and, so far, 15 gravesites. Moreover, one of the Antiquities Ministry’s images suggests that one of the graves was still “occupied” on discovery.
Image: Facebook/Ministry of Antiquities
The gravesites were further notable because of their many “mastabas.” These are large, tomb-like structures, made of mudbrick – a construction material common in places where the wood used for baking bricks is scarce. These mastabas, though, are the most ancient in Egypt, being older even than those in the Saqqara necropolis in the north.
Image: Roweromaniak
When the head of the Ministry of Antiquities officially announced its discovery, he underlined the potential importance of what the organization had found, arguing that the find could tell us more about some of the earliest Egyptian people. After all, the area is a treasure trove for its archaeologists, with other important sites, like the aforementioned Temple of Seti I, in close proximity to the newly discovered settlement.
Image: Brigitte Djajasasmita
Chris Eyre, an Egyptologist from the University of Liverpool, told the BBC that the necropolis (meaning, literally, a “city of the dead”) is critically important in our understanding of the history of the area. “About a mile behind where this material is said to be, we have the necropolis with royal tombs, going from before history to the period where we start getting royal names, we start getting identifiable kings,” he said.
Image: Robert Fraser
Besides Eyre, scientists around the world concurred with the Ministry’s initial assertion that this was an especially important find. And, according to the Ministry’s head Mahmoud Afify, the fact that this find was made by Egyptian researchers and not by foreigners was another laudable aspect of the discovery.
Image: tim rich and lesley katon
Indeed, the history of Westerners – especially French and British explorers – investigating and taking Ancient Egyptian artifacts from the country is still understandably a sore point. In November 2016, for example, Egypt’s Antiquities Minister Khaled Anany protested the auctioning of Ancient Egyptian statues in London.
Image: Rain is Cool
Elsewhere, however, the country is having some success in regaining its lost artifacts. For example, after two years of campaigning the Antiquities Ministry regained an Ancient Egyptian panel from Switzerland – a black granite slab engraved with a goddess and her human sacrifices. Reportedly, somebody stole the panel from a temple in 1990. What’s more, the Ministry recovered a similar panel from the U.S. in 2011.
Image: Brigitte Djajasasmita
The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry’s latest significant discovery is, then, a matter of national pride. And another indirect, positive consequence of the find is that it may also help to revive tourism, which has sadly diminished in the region in recent years.
Image: reibai
Yet aside from the newly discovered settlement, the area around the ancient city of Abydos has in fact always been a point of interest for the international archaeological community in its own right. Indeed, the Temple of Seti has caused scientists quite a bit of trouble in the past.
Image: Brigitte Djajasasmita
Now, as you’d expect of an Ancient Egyptian temple, the walls are decorated with carvings that depict images and ideas from the archaic society. However, some of carvings in the temple have caused a stir among commentators in the past.
Image: Rain is Cool
Because on one of the walls, there are carvings that appear to depict high-tech machinery. Some people believe these are UFOs, but others apparently look like helicopters, fighter aircraft and submarines.
Image: Ian Gampon
Mainstream archaeologists, meanwhile, have dismissed these theories on the 3,000-year-old pictures as “pseudoarchaeology.” However, supporters of the theory maintain that these are accurate drawings. What’s more, they suppose that the markings are also evidence of time travel.
Image: Brigitte Djajasasmita
Of course, theories which posit that the Ancient Egyptians somehow had access to advanced technology are far from new. And, inevitably, these pictures will be exciting to those who believe such hypotheses. After all, these arguments often suppose that aliens visited our planet and gave us access of technologies far beyond our reckoning.
Image: reibai
However, there are other, more mainstream theories as to why the carvings might look this way. Some researchers, for example, say that the different carvings have been put one on top of another. In fact, the Sunday Express described this as an “ancient typo.”
Image: Rain is Cool
In this case, it’s thought that the hieroglyphics actually represent the names of pharaohs. So, according to the website Rain is Cool, the high-tech looking symbols are a combination of the names of Ramesses II and Seti I.
Image: Robert Fraser
Meanwhile, archaeologists continue to excavate the newly discovered site near Abydos. And, who knows: perhaps it will continue to yield other interesting insights into the life of the ancient Egyptians?

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